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WHO TOLD YOU SO?! #2 Truth vs. Organisation

“The trust of the innocent is the liar’s most useful tool” - Stephen King

Onomatopee 75.2

Opening Friday 8 June, 20:00
On show 9 June - 15 July

This second chapter of Who told you so‽! focuses on the story of Truth vs. Organisation. Stimulated by and parallel to the rise of mass media such as newspapers, radio and television in the early 20th century, people started organising themselves socially, beyond the boundaries of villages and countries. In the Netherlands this resulted in a compartmentalised society, administered top-down by the leaders of the different compartments and regulated by the union representatives, broadcasters the church and so on.

 

Regardless of the religious secularisation that took place, these models of organisation were able to maintain a base – and therefor power – by slightly adapting the range of their production. As social organisations, they found a new economic basis to empower this, by altering their products from class and religion based into a market based story, which emerged in a left and right political spectrum. At this time, due to the fading of European and globally cultural and economic borders and the emergence of new economies and media, these systems begin to erode internally. The new calls for organisation are conservative or progressive. This overlooks the economic management of the “left” and “right” culture, which should be shaped through public and private investment. There is no body that can provide a basis for the new administration.

What is remarkable is the growing gap between younger generations who are open to the necessary risks of our globalised world, and the older generations who are afraid to lose their accomplishments, as can be identified in the divide between the young and the older segments of labour unions; for example in Spain, where the youth has no future, or in the Netherlands, where a grey wave of elderly people is likely to become a heavy financial burden.

Within this context, the increased presence of purely commercial broadcasting stations – that are dominated by the state in Italy, but unprecedented in the Netherlands until the early 90’s – created a diffuse and distrustful landscape for social recognition and identification, thus giving power to a growing mistrust These commercial platforms do not hold any social representation; they are a body without spirit. Meanwhile, new media add another layer of confusion, allowing everyone to get their voice heard and use their own sources: from the populist and anti Eastern-European Freedom Party blogs, to blogs by Occupy groups. And what did Occupy represent anyway? Is it the post-political mass of undecided voters? Is that the definition of the multitude...?

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With: Azra Aksamija (INT), Elena Bajo (INT), Hank Willis Thomas (US), Heath Bunting (UK), Jacqueline Schoemaker (NL), Job Janssen (NL), Tracy Mackenna & Edwin Janssen (INT), Paul Segers (NL), and Anikó Loránt and Kaszás Tamás (HU).
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project specific poem by Serge van Duijnhoven
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project specific texts by Markus MiessenAlfredo Cramerotti and Wim Langenhoff
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project specific publications by Jacqueline Schoemaker (graphic design by Arthur Roeloffzen) and Elena Bajo (graphic design by Novak)

Publication

Freek Lomme, Elena Bajo, 2012

Factory of Forms: Relational settings by Elena Bajo

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By affirming our fluid being and allowing ourselves to relate within the open structures where we find and may engage with a multitude of carriers, the sum of this stage situates both our heartfelt desire to relate with the common, as the ethical and technocratic conditions to level the common.

Here we face up with physical carriers of data, known and unknown, familiar, readable and unfamiliar, open to engage or lost in translation. By relying on chance, contingency and ubiquity, Bajo’s research-inspired and concept-desired work seeks to evoke poetical, non-hierarchical and emancipatory situations. Acting within this choreography’s sculptural setting, we live up playfully. Here, through coincidental contacts of test print runs, encountered archive material gathered and reframed by Elena Bajo and Bastien Rousseau as well as via our human, poetical capacity to relate, weinclude a disrupted fl ow of semi-capitalist logics within our personal lives and our collective spirit; relating on the currents of doubts and default acting underneath. As modern, abstract logic attempts to sustain its surface, this scene evokes a personal and sincere struggle, which challenges to dive underneath, without any guarantee to find ground.

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Editors: Freek Lomme, Elena Bajo
Project management: Freek Lomme
Texts: Freek Lomme, Bastien Rousseau, Elena Bajo
Translations introduction and backflap: Urok Shirhan
Graphic design: Novak

Made possible thanks to: Manifesta 9, Manifesta 9 Parallel Projects, Stad Genk, Jan Van Eyck Academie, D+T Project, s/t Same Titled, A/CE Accion Cultural Espanola

 

Type
softcover
Dimensions
190 x 270 mm / 7,5 x 10,6 inch
Pages
80
ISBN
978-90-78454-88-5 
Editor
Freek Lomme, Elena Bajo
Author
Freek Lomme, Bastien Rousseau, Elena Bajo
Graphic
Novak
Artist
Elena Bajo
Language
English
Paper
Cover: Revive pure white silk 250 gr/m2. Inside: Revive pure white offset 100 gr/m2 + Revive 100 natural uncoated 80 gr/m2 
Edition
500
Color
black/white + PMS Green and PMS 709
Printer
Lecturis, Eindhoven (NL)
Text editor
Urok Shirhan
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Jacqueline Schoemaker, Freek Lomme , 2012

The Undivided City / De ongedeelde stad by Jacqueline Schoemaker

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The Undivided City, by Jacqueline Schoemaker, deals with the shifting borders between controlled and uncontrolled space, with the interaction between an individual user of the urban space and the planned environment. The title is derived from a policy instrument by which population groups are spread across the city in order to prevent ghetto forming but by which human behaviour is normalised and uniformity is the result. In this book Jacqueline Schoemaker cuts the city into slices by walking straight lines through it. In a kind of horizontal archaeology she observes and experiences the urban space at the same time. The insights which result form the walking very concretely touch on the meaning of the concept of ‘community’.

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Text and translation:Jacqueline Schoemaker
Final editing: Jacqueline Schoemaker, Freek Lomme
Graphic design: Arthur Roeloffzen

 

Type
pocket
Dimensions
150 x 210 mm / 5,9 x 8,3 inch
Pages
129
ISBN
978­90­78454­86­1
Editor
Jacqueline Schoemaker, Freek Lomme 
Author
Jacqueline Schoemaker 
Graphic
Arthur Roeloffzen
Language
English
Paper
Cover: Lessebo Design 1.3 naturel 300 gr, PMS 8003 & PMS 226. Inside: Lessebo Design 1.3 naturel 100 gr, black/white
Edition
750
Printer
Lecturis, Eindhoven (NL)
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THE PEOPLE WHO’VE WORKED ON THIS PROJECT

  • Freek Lomme curator, editor, poet, writer website