Created with Sketch.
Created with Sketch.

Out of the Desert of the Real / Into the Desert of the Mind.

Onomatopee 135

Opening March 11, 16:00
At 16:30 Paul will deliver his performance, ‘Bullet Head & the Exit Goons’. We will celebrate the launch of the book accordingly, with an introduction by Sebastian Olma, professor for Autonomy in Art & Design.

The work of Paul Segers, born and based in Eindhoven, gives prominence to manifestations of lurking excess: illusive and thought-provoking scenes, portraits and landscapes. In his work, threatening signs of acceleration, polarisation and technological overload are configured.

The exhibition consists of two parts. First of all, the performance ‘Bullet Head & the Exit Goons’, situated in an in-between of something like a staged studio set and a slaughterhouse, will deal with a rather robust physical social exchange. The performance will be documented; the “stage” will be left unharmed after the performance for the duration of the show.

Second is the first screening of a video made in Helmond: Mark the Points of No Return (2016). In the publication, launched at the start of the show, author and cultural critic Mark Dery writes about this work: ‘For 13 days and nights, the patient, a 40-year-old white male (hereinafter, “P.”), lived in a guerrilla campsite on the grounds of the Cacaofabriek arts center in Helmond, in a hovel he’d cobbled together from the remains of previous works: wooden beams, metal struts, plastic sheeting. He took up residence in his makeshift abode after the opening for a group exhibition, “Nonfiction” (2015), of which his encampment, “Mark the Points of No Return,” was a part, he said. In documentary photos, we see P., barefoot but still wearing the dark suit he wore to the opening, pottering about amid the bare necessities of civilization: canned food, a water cask, a campfire, a short-handled axe for splitting firewood, bottles of wine and wine glasses, a typewriter, toilet paper, a copy of Hardt and Negri’s critique of globalization, Empire. In a video, he bathes naked in a nearby canal, its black waters scummed by algal bloom. As the slate-gray sky grows light, he sits, stolidly watching cars whoosh past on the adjoining roadway, tires thrumming.’

As many certainties of the past are overturned, the surreality of “the outsider” might become more acceptable to conservatives’ experience. Paul Segers builds on the hypothetical opportunities of the settings in these scenes, delivering an array of hard-core exposures. Rigorously broad-minded and without any bias, these scenes are real scenarios.

 

 

 

Agenda

Publication

Paul Segers, 2017

The scene changes

€ 25

add to basket

The Scene Changes gives prominence to manifestations of lurking excess: illusive and thought-provoking scenes, portraits and landscapes, by artist Paul Segers. In his work, threatening signs of acceleration, polarisation and technological overload are configured.
As many certainties of the past are overturned, the surreality of “the outsider” might become more acceptable to conservatives’ eyes’ experience. Paul Segers builds on the hypothetical opportunities of the settings in these scenes, delivering an array of hard-core exposures. Rigorously broad-minded and without any bias, these scenes are real scenarios.

The Method surveys assemblage/collage, the essential approach for developing and creating works; first on paper and then in physical, three-dimensional form.
The Infiltrator focuses on performative works in which Segers becomes the protagonist/antagonist in his self-styled scenarios.
The Machine Head brings together Segers’ collection of machines that serve no real purpose other than being sculptural metaphors for technological paradoxes.
Daily Practice shows Segers re-imagining the businesses and practices of the postmodern work force.

To come to a better understanding of the exceptional value of the marginal position taken by the artist, three texts are included. Sebastian Olma positions the artist in the here and now as a veritable ‘Comrade of Time’, a concept coined by the Russian art theorist Boris Groys. The Infiltrator by Ine Gevers approaches Segers as a performance artist who ‘acts out’ environments, images and objects from society in alternative scenes. Finally, weaving a narrative out of biographical information, critical and pop cultural references and taking us along the scenes of the various works, Mark Dery unifies all matter in ruminations what life in these scenes may have to offer.

---
Editor: Paul Segers
Essays by: Mark DeryIne Gevers, Sebastian Olma & Jonathan Brewer
Graphic Design:  ATTAK • Powergestaltung
Supported by: The Mondriaan Fund, BKKC – Brabants Kenniscentrum Kunst en Cultuur, Constant van Renesse Fund & The Unlimited Dream Company.

Type
softcover
Dimensions
230 x 117 mm / 9 x 7 inches portrait
Pages
220
ISBN
978-94-91677-63-2
Editor
Paul Segers
Author
various
Graphic
Attak
Language
English
Binding
otabind
Paper
300 g/m2 Invercote Creato (Cover) and 120 g/m2 Munken Polar Rough, Cyclus Offset 140 g/m2, chromolux white 150 g/m2 (inside pages)
Edition
800
Color
96 full color images, 7 black/white 
Printer
Drukkerij Tielen, Boxtel (NL)
more specs

THE PEOPLE WHO’VE WORKED ON THIS PROJECT

  • Paul Segers artist website
  • Attak graphic designer
  • Sebastian Olma theorist
  • Mark Dery theorist
  • Ine Gevers critic
  • Jonathan Brewer critic